Tag Archives: history

Book signing at the D-Day Museum on Sunday

On Sunday I will be at the D-Day Museum in Southsea to give a short talk about my book ‘Portsmouth’s World War Two Heroes’. Afterwards I will be signing copies.

The talk starts at 2pm, and is included in the usual admission price to the museum, or £2 for the talk alone. The book signing afterwards is free to all.

Hope to see you there!

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Portsmouth’s WW2 Heroes Book Tour underway

Last night I have my first talk based on my new book, ‘Portsmouth’s World War Two Heroes’. The audience at the D-Day Museum were the Portsmouth Museums and Records Society, a group that I first joined as a committee member at the age of 17! I’ve lectured the Society three times now, so you could say I’m something of an old hand by now!

As always it was great to get out and present some history, hear some comments and answer some questions. For me, that’s why you should want to write history – to take it to people. I can’t stand why authors wouldn’t want to take their book out to people and interact with the public?! It’s like a band producing an album and then never going on tour or doing any interviews!

The first copies of the book arrived at the Museum for sale in the afternoon, and were on the shelves in time for the talk. Five lucky guests went away with the first signed copies of ‘Portsmouth’s World War Two Heroes’. The book is now for sale at the D-Day Museum in Portsmouth, and hopefully early next week will be available at the City Museum as well.

I have several more talks booked – in Gosport, ironically – and a signing and talk at the D-Day Museum for the general public in March, please see my Talks page for details. I am in discussions with another couple of venues and groups about some more events. If anyobody out there is a talks organiser for a local group and you think you might like to book me, please feel free to get in touch.

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Portsmouth’s World War Two Heroes arrives!

Yesterday I received the first advance copy of my new book ‘Portsmouth’s World War Two Heroes’ through the post.

The publishers inform me that the book will be leaving the distributors warehouse early next week, so hopefully we should start seeing books appearing on the bookshelves and through the online outlets in the near future!

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War Horse

War Horse (film)

Image via Wikipedia

I’ve just got in from seeing War Horse, so I thought I would post a review while it’s still fresh in my mind.

The film is set in Iddisleigh, a picturesque village in Devon not far from my better half’s place of origin. The scenery is absolutely stunning, and equally well matched by the soaring, classical soundtrack. Some of the action scenes are mind-blowing, particularly the cavalry charges. The battle scenes are not as bloody as say Band of Brothers or the Pacific, but I don’t really think that they needed to be horrific for the sake of it.

In historical terms, there were perhaps a few bloopers. The german accents are almost laughable, and I can’t think for the life of me why Spielberg didn’t make them sound better. And in the final scenes in France all kinds of random men in random units seem to mingle together freely, which seems a bit unrealistic. But apart from that, it seemed to ring true for the most part. It IS a completely unrealistic story – but then that is the beauty of a novel, it doesn’t have to be absolutely realistic, and we can forgive a little historic or artisitic licence if it serves the story.

My performing arts student girlfriend tells me that there isn’t any particularly great acting, in fact the real star of the film is/are the horse(s). This film is very much an epic rather than a drama. That said, there are some very touching moments – apart from the final reunion scene, when the main equine protagonist becomes entangled in barbed wire is likely to move even the most cynical of hearts.

Whenever a new war film or programme comes out, you can guarantee that there will be scores of internet ‘experts’, bemoaning the inaccuracies and claiming the moral high ground. Sure, no war film is ever 100% accurate. But they can never be – no one really dies in a war film, surely? We need to look beyond the historical inaccuracies of incorrect shoulder titles or weapons. They might matter to us geeks, but in the bigger picture a film like War Horse has got thousands of people interested in the First World War, which is something that no manner of scholarly articles or mediocre books will achieve. Neither geeks, enthusiasts nor academics have any universal ownership of war. War is a human experience that touches everyone when it occurs, so it is the right of everyone to be interested by it.

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Three weeks to Publication!

It’s just under three weeks – 20 days, to be exact! – until my first book, ‘Portsmouth’s World War Two Heroes’, is published!

It’s been a long time coming but it’s exciting to know that it’s not far away now. The official publication date is 01 February, apparently the books should materialise sometime later in the month. There should be an official youtube trailer available some time soon too.

If anybody would like to pre-order, you can pre-order from the following online outlets:

Amazon

The History Press

Waterstones

WH Smith

Foyles

Play.com

Book Depository

Telegraph Books

Guardian Books

It should also be on sale in local bookshops, including the D-Day Museum and Portsmouth City Museum.

If anybody is trying to order from abroad, I have seen it listed on American, Canadian, New Zealand and even Polish websites – let me know and I will try and find you a link.

If anybody would like a signed copy, please let me know and I will see what I can do. I am hoping to have a number of signing events over the next year or so.

Happy reading!

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2nd Portsmouth Pals Battalion War Diary located!

For a long time I had been labouring under the misaprehension that only a select few WW1 war diaries had been made available for download via The National Archives Documents Online service. In such a manner I had downloaded a copy of the 1st Hampshire’s War Diary some time ago, and not long ago I posted up a summary of their activities from Le Cateau in August 1914 until the beginning of 1918. It’s a thread that I’m sure I will pick up again some time in the future.

But thanks to browsing on the Grear War Forum, I have discovered that more War Diaries are available than I had originally thought. It works like this – for many Battalions, in particular territorial or hostilities only, the Battalion diaries have been grouped by brigade, hence by a cursory glance, it appears that it is only the Brigade HQ War Diary that is available. But, and here’s the golden bit, they are actually consolidated – so in reality you get four for the price of one!

Of course I have a very keen interest in the Portsmouth Pals, as I will be carrying out a lot of research into their formation, their membership, their battles and their losses. Sadly the war diary for the 1st Portsmouth Pals (14th Hampshires) is not available, and will necessitate a trip to Kew, but that of the 2nd Portsmouth Pals (15th Hampshires) is.

I’ve downloaded a couple of hundred page PDF’s, and although I have only had a quick flick through, it seems like it is unusually detailed for a war diary. Not necessarily in terms of grid references, maps or operational matters, but it does seem to give an unusually high amount of attention to other ranks rather than just officers. Of course this will be priceless for finding out about when Private X died, or when Sergeant Z won his Military Medal.

Let the transcribing begin!

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Walking the Somme by Paul Reed

Regular readers will probably need no introduction to Paul Reed. A prolific military historian, he is also a battlefield guide and a regular expert on the TV screens when it comes to military history. One of those people who makes you wonder, how do they fit it all in?!

Hopefully one day I will get myself to the Somme, and when I do this book will be in my rucksack. But until then a read of this is not a bad substitute. I wonder how many people, like me, own plenty of battlefield guides but have never been anywhere near the places? I find that because they are written in a manner aiming to interpret the lie of the land, and bring the battle to life, battlefield guidebooks come across like that even if you’re reading them in the comfort of your own home. And surely that is the whole intention of writing history? It’s something that Paul Reed does very well here. My understanding of the Battle of the Somme has been vastly improved thanks to this book. In particular, I have a much stronger grasp on what happened to the Portsmouth Pals- the 14th and 15th Hampshires – at Flers and Guillemont respectively. And considering I’m quite new to studying the Great War, but looking to publish a book on it myself in the non too distant future, thats a very useful thing.

The battlefield of the Somme is ‘broken up’ into a series walks, logical in scope and and sensible in duration. The book is amply illustrated, with photographs, archive maps and sketch maps – which somehow are very evocative of the great war, a nice touch. I also like how it concentrates far more on the common soldier than it does on the Generals, which is not always the case with First World War books! Sensibly, Paul has concentrated on the battlefields themselves, without swamping the reader with ancilliary information. Most of us have the internet at hand nowadays, and tourist information for Albert should be at our fingertips with a quick google search. Hence theres no need to overload the book with hotels, trains and toilets, when there is far more interesting stuff to think about.

This book was actually first published almost twenty years ago. And I have to say, considering the changes in technology and the shifts in military history since then, it has ‘aged’ remarkably well. I guess its comparable to, say, writing a battlefield guide now, say, for an iphone app, who knows what innovations might take place between now and twenty years time? So to pass the test of time is no small achievement.

Walking the Somme is published by Pen and Sword

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Thoughts on War Memorials

Given my recent work researching names on War Memorials, I have been thinking about the history of War Memorials themselves.

Of course, they are important – anything that helps us remember the sacrifices of generations past cannot be a bad thing. But then again, are there aspects of the war memorial in popular culture that, in a non-intentional way, limit our remembrance? Are they a convenient way of shoeboxing remembrance? Are they a relic of Victorian and Edwardian fascination with grief?

Think about it. A certain place in a town is the place where we remember fallen heroes. Does that mean that we don’t remember them anywhere else? I guess its like Armistice Day – why should we only remember them one day a year out of 365? Does that mean that they don’t matter for the other 364?

In another sense, there is also something quite limiting about war memorials, in that very often they only show the name, or in some cases, only initials. And of course, unless you knew them, can lists of unknown names really be ‘remembered’? Does it encourage us to think ‘thats their names, they’re remembered’ and leave them there, when in actual fact, we can’t remember them if we know nothing about them in the first place?

Of course I’m not suggesting that we tear down war memorials. They are a part of our heritage. But in the modern world, with technology and no end of information at our fingertips, why limit remembrance to names in stone? We say ‘we will remember them’, and that they won’t be forgotten, but surely if all we know is someone’s name and thats about it, then they’re virtually forgotten anyway?

 

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Sneak peak of the cover!

The History Press have today listed my forthcoming book, ‘Portsmouth’s World War Two Heroes’, on their website. And alongside the listing, is also a sneak peek of the cover!

Portsmouth’s World War Two Heroes – The History Press

I’m working through the proofreading as we speak, before I get cracking on the index. Happy days!

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Playing the Game: the British junior officer on the Western Front 1914-1918 by Christopher Moore-Bick

Much has been written about British senior officers in the Great War – the so called ‘Donkeys’. With popular cultural references such as ‘Oh what a lovely war’ and ‘Blackadder goes forth‘, it became an orthodoxy for many years that the British General Staff between 1914 and 1918 were Victorian and incompetent. In recent times, there have been a number of reactions to this. Firstly, attempts have been made to ‘rehabilitate the donkeys’, with varying success. And in a more refreshing manner, much effort has been put into uncovering the experiences of the rank and file on the Western Front, particularly poignant with the passing of the Harry Patch generation.

But somewhere in between those two appraches, we are missing something – an understanding of the lives of the junior officers of the British Army, those who commanded platoons and companies, whether regular, territorial or volunteer. And that void presents us with an opportunity. Not only to understand the middle level of the British Army in 1914-18, but also to take a closer look at the society that created them. And that’s what Christopher Moore-Bick has done very ably here.

In many respects the Great War heralded the end of the Victorian/Edwardian society in Britain. The title of the book is indicative of this – to young officers, everything was akin to a game, played on the public school playing fields. Baden-Powell encouraged his Boy Scouts to ‘play up, play up, and play the game!’. Portsmouth’s supporters, around the same time, encouraged their team to ‘Play up’. It could well be argued that the loss of so many young, educated men harmed British society irrevocably – how many future generals and politicians perished in Flanders fields?

It would not be enough to simply confine a look at the BEF‘s junior officers to their activities during the war and on the front line, and this book does not disappoint. Moore-Bick takes a broad view, examining Education and Upbringing, Training, the psychology of fear, responsibility and personal development working relationships with seniors and juniors, class factors, social activities and leisure pursuits, morale, bravery, identity and the relationship between war, dying and the public school ethos. No historical stone is left unturned.

A glance at the endnotes and bibliography gives an impression of just how hard the author must have worked on this project. Prolific use has been made of primary sources, in particular testimonies of junior officers. Great use has been made of a wide range of secondary published sources also. It is always impressive to see the reading that has gone into an authors approach and conclusions.

The only reservation I have about this book, is the manner in which Winchester College is mentioned profusely throughout. It transpires, reading the authors biography, that he is an ex-pupil of Winchester College. I’m sure that old-school tie is inspirational to people who didn’t go to the local state school, but it is slightly over-present here. I guess in a way that is an example of the class loyalties shown by junior officers during the Great War – the only school that existed was the one that you went to, and the only and by far the best Regiment in the British Army was the one that you joined. Tribal loyalties did breed healthy competition.

This book is a godsend to those researching the social history of the British Army in the First World War. For a first book it is a very credible effort, and I can only marvel at the time and effort that it must have taken to research. I’m going to find it invaluable during my research in the months and years to come.

Playing the Game: The British Junior Infantry Officer on the Western Front 1914-1918 is published by Helion

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Portsmouth’s WW2 Heroes Remembrance Sunday talks a success

Just a quick note to everyone who came down to the D-Day Museum yesterday. My talks went really well, and we had more than 70 people for each. And not all of them were friends and family! I had some very interesting questions about Portsmouth’s World War Two Dead, and none of them too awkward! Just out of interest, the Museum had 1,149 visitors yesterday, which was almost 50% more than Remembrance Sunday last year!

Thank you to my sister Nicola for the picture, to my girlfriend Sarah and family for coming down, and also friends and colleagues for supporting me too. And of course Andrew Whitmarsh at the D-Day Museum for booking me, and the staff at D-Day for helping make the day go so well.

It’s been a good couple of days, last night we (Portsmouth City Museum) won a clean sweep at the Portsmouth News Guide Awards – Best exhibition for Little Black Dress, and runner up for Football in the City!

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D-Day Museum on Remembrance Sunday

Just a little reminded that I will be speaking at the D-Day Museum in Portsmouth this coming Remembrance Sunday.

The Museum is open from 10am. I will be speaking at 12noon and 2pm, giving a short talk on my forthcoming book, ‘Portsmouth’s World War Two Heroes’. Entry to the Museum is free all day, and there is no need to book.

I’m just putting the finishing touches to my notes. If you come down, feel free to say hello and ask me anything you like!

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Message from James

Hi folks.!

Just a quick message to let you know what has been going on, and in some cases not going in, in the Daly History HQ recently.

Firstly, I’ve been getting over a nasty cold man-flu that laid me low for most of last week. Then when I thought I’d recovered from that, my eye swelled up like I’d taken a nasty right hook. You know the episode of the Para’s where they do the milling? It looked like I’d done a few rounds of that. Turns out I had the worst case of conjunctivitis the doctor had ever seen!

Now I’ve recovered from that, but sadly my trusty laptop is no more, and has a nasty crack in the LCD screen, from causes unknown. So whilst I investigate the feasibility of battle damagee repairs or procuring a replacement, posts may be intermittent and I may be slower at responding to emails that I would normally like. It’s a shame, as I’ve got a few interesting books to review for you, and some interesting events coming up.

Oh well, as they say, no plan ever survives the first contact with the enemy. Do not be surprised if chaos reigns – it undoubtedly will!

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A Message from your AWARD WINNING blogger!

I’m rather overwhelmed to announce that I found out this evening that I have been given an award for my blog!

The team at the Veterans Benefits GI Bill website have decided that Daly History is one of the top 50 military history blogs on the whole of the internet, and hence you can see a nice shiny award picture just to the right ——>>>>

Have a look at the award announcement here, to see the team’s very flattering words, and also to see a list of other winners. Other names you might recognise are Ross Mahoney’s Thoughts on Military History, Birmingham War Studies, Airminded and the Australian War Memorial. It’s quite a suprise to be counted amongst such leading lights!

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Speaking at the D-Day Museum on Remembrance Sunday

Sherman

A Sherman tank outside the Museum (Image by Merlin_1 via Flickr)

I’m very pleased to announce that I will be speaking at the D-Day Museum in Portsmouth on Remembrance Sunday this year, 13 November.

I will be talking a look at the sacrifices made by 2,549 men and women from Portsmouth who died between 1939 and 1947, and telling some of their stories. It should be an interesting little taster of my forthcoming book, due out in February 2012.

The talks will begin at 12noon and 2pm (same talk each time), and the Museum will be free all day, opening at 10am and last admission at 4.30pm, closing at 5pm.

Look forward to seeing you there!

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