Recognising the Portsmouth Pals Battalions

English: Original Kitchener World War I Recrui...

English: Original Kitchener World War I Recruitment poster. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If you think of a ‘Pals Battalion‘, you will invariably think of a bunch of lads from a northern, industrial working class town. Say, Hull, Sheffield, Manchester, Tyneside, or Liverpool. So ingrained has this perception of the pals become, that you could be forgiven for thinking that nowhere south of Watford Gap raised any similar units. I even remember reading on a military history forum that, in the opinion of one member, a Battalion had to be from the North of England to be entitled to be called a Pals Battalion.

I’ve just taken Peter Simkins excellent ‘Kitchener’s Army: The Raising of the New Armies 1914-1916′ out of the library. It is without doubt a great history of how the New Armies were recruited and raised, and launched into action, and Simkins does give good coverage to some non-Northern Pals – the Royal Sussex Downs Battalions, for example, and the Cardiff Pals. Yet I am slightly amazed to find not one mention of the 14th and 15th Battalions of the Hampshire Regiment, or, as they were otherwise known, the 1st and 2nd Portsmouth Pals.

I don’t think that history has been too kind to the Portsmouth Pals. Formed by the Mayor of Portsmouth and recruited locally, overwhelmingly from local young lads, many of whom no doubt knew each other, I think they are perfectly entitled to be called Pals. They served in the same manner as other better-known Pals Battalions, in particular at Flers and Guillemont on the Somme and again at Third Ypres, and were in New Army Divisions. Obviously, by the end of the war the numbers were being made up by men who were not from Portsmouth, but all the same, losses were horrific. The 14th Battalion lost 644 men killed, whilst the 15th lost 781 men. When we consider that the amount of wounded was often three times the number of those killed, then the two Portsmouth Pals Battalions lost their entire strength several times over as casualties.

For Portsmouth to raise two Pals Battalions – or three if we count the 16th Battalion, the Depot Battalion – was nothing short of magnificent. Remember that a very large proportion of Portsmouth’s young men were already serving in the Royal Navy, working in the Dockyard or were perhaps already serving soldiers, Portsmouth being a significant garrison town at the time. Nowhere else south of London managed to equal this feat. The Royal Sussex Regiment did have three ‘Downs’ Battalions that could be refered to as Pals, but these recruited from a much wider area and didn’t quite have the same link to place as the Portsmouth Pals did.

To put things into context, Southampton – at the time comparable in size to Portsmouth – did not raise any Pals Battalions of its own. Perhaps the people of Portsmouth were so keen to do their bit, as they were well used to sending young men off to fight, and it did not take too much to stir the martial spirit in a town that would have been full of serving and retired sailors and soldiers. I’m looking forward to reading the Portsmouth Evening News editions from those heady days in the summer of 1914. To what extent did these brave young men answer Lord Kitcheners call?

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20 Comments

Filed under Army, portsmouth heroes, western front, World War One

20 responses to “Recognising the Portsmouth Pals Battalions

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  6. Gary

    Hi, I found this blog after seeing a reference to the Pompey Pals in a Portsmouth football match report from the Independent that says the club adopted red socks in honour of the Pals (something I had not heard before as the change to red socks did not happen until 1947). I thought you may find such an honour, if true, interesting: http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/football-league/the-calvin-report-on-portsmouth-2-coventry-city-0-pompey-win-debtors-derby-while-both-teams-await-higher-judgment-8547164.html

  7. If you look at the WW1 Royal Hampshire order of battle, Southampton is massively underrepresented. I don’t understand why, perhaps yeomanry, cavalry or some other service recruited there instead?

  8. DM Andy

    Jon, if you look at the names on the Southampton Cenotaph, I don’t think you’ll find Southampton massively underrepresented.

    • Bart

      There are about 5000 names on the Portsmouth Cenotaph. About 2400 on the Southampton equivalent. It would be interesting to investigate why there is such a difference.
      One partial explanation is perhaps that some parts of the present-day city of Southampton were not considered part of Southampton when the memorial was made. But then some parts of present-day Portsmouth were, I suppose, not considered part of Portsmouth then either.

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